Friday, July 29, 2016

France’s National Health And Safety Agency Calls For Reducing Children’s Wireless Exposures: ANSES 2016 Report

France’s National Health And Safety Agency Calls For Reducing Children’s Wireless Exposures: ANSES 2016 Report

France’s National Health Agency Calls For Reducing Children’s Wireless Exposures
The National Agency of Health Security of Food, Environment and Labour Report All wireless devices, from tablets, remote controlled toys, wireless toys, baby monitors, and cell phones should be subjected to tighter regulatory limits.
france-flag-1058699_1280On July 8, the French National Agency of Health Security of Food, Environment and Labour (ANSES) published a new scientific report “Radiofrequency Exposure and the Health of Children”.
Concluding that children are more vulnerable to radio frequency (RF) wireless exposures, the French report recommends immediately reducing exposures to wireless radiation from all wireless devices for young children. Acknowledging the inadequacies of current outdated RF regulations, ANSES recommends strengthening RF exposure limits with child protective safety margins and developing more sophisticated premarket test methods to fully assess  human exposures to RF radiation from wireless devices. The new report has made headlines across the country.
Report States Children Exposed More and Early
“Unlike previous generations, children are exposed today to multiple RF sources at a young age…Children are not miniature adults…because of their smaller size, their anatomical and morphological characteristics and the characteristics of some of their tissues, they are more exposed. In particular, the peripheral areas of their brains are more vulnerable than adults to RF.”
child-1183465_1920This French national report affirms recent EHT publications showing greater absorption and vulnerability of the young to cell phone radiation. IEEE/Access: Dosimetric Simulations of Brain Absorption of Mobile Phone Radiation: the relationship between psSAR and age.



Recommendations of the Agency
The government agency recommends to “reconsider the regulatory exposure limits” to ensure “sufficiently large safety margins” to protect the health of young children:
  • All wireless devices, including tablets, cordless phones, remote controlled toys, wireless toys, baby monitors and surveillance bracelets, should be subjected to the same regulatory obligations as cell phones.
  • Compliance with regulatory exposure limits should be insured for the ways that devices are customarily used, such as positioned in contact with the body.
  • Exposure limits for radiofrequency electromagnetic fields should be tightened  to ensure sufficiently large safety margins to protect the health and safety of the general population, particularly the health and safety of children.
  • Reliance on the specific absorption rate (SAR) to set human exposure limits should be re-evaluated and replaced through the development of an indicator to assess real exposures for mobile phone users that applies to various conditions: signal type,  good or bad reception, mode of use (call, data loading, etc.), location device is used on the body.
  • ANSES reiterated its recommendation, as previously stated, to reduce exposure to children: minimize use and prefer a hands-free kit.
Scientific Research Substantiates France’s Expert Recommendations
Wi-Fi tablet into head of child from tablet - Image“For several decades, my research and that of many others has shown that children and smaller adults will absorb relatively more radiation from mobile devices. Unfortunately, proper research on long term use has not been done to determine the full health impacts on children. I am one of many researchers who strongly recommend strengthening current regulations to protect children,” stated EHT advisor Om Gandhi of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, who has published multiple research studies indicating that children absorb radiation deeper into their brains than adults.
“Coming on the heels of the U.S. government study showing increased risks of rare tumors of the brain and heart tied with wireless radiation in rats, this new French government report provides a welcome reminder of the importance of protecting young brains and bodies. The absence of proof of harm in our children at this time should not be confused with evidence of safety,” added Devra Davis PhD MPH, FACE, Visiting Professor of Medicine, The Hebrew University and President of Environmental Health Trust. “We cannot afford to treat the young as subjects in an experiment for which we will soon have no unexposed control group,” she added.
“Our published research on cell phones but also tablets and laptops indicates that equivalent exposures to radio frequency results in different doses to specific tissues in children compared with adults. The wireless device certification process should be complemented with a computer simulation process using anatomically based models of different ages,” stated Professors Claudio Fernandez and Alvaro de Salles, EHT Advisors from the Electrical Engineering Departments of the Federal Institute and University of Rio Grande do Sul, IFRS and UFRGS, Brazil.
Over Twenty Governments Have Enacted Protective Policy
earth-11009_1280France previously enacted highly protective laws in regards to radiofrequency exposures. Wi-Fi is banned in kindergarten and OFF is the default setting in elementary schools (unless if specific classroom instruction requires it during certain time periods). French national law also addresses cell tower emissions compliance and labels Wi-Fi transmitters in public spaces. French cell phone legislation bans cell phones for young children, mandates SAR labeling, and requires that all cell phones are sold with headsets. This new report calls for tightening regulations even further in light of findings that children experiences serious learning and other problems tied with wireless exposures. Over twenty countries and governments have enacted various protective policies to reduce radiofrequency exposure to children.
ANSES also called for more research evaluating the health and psychosocial impact (academic learning, social and family relationships, etc.) in children, related to the use of mobile communication technologies, particularly because of addictive phenomena, disorders in circadian rhythms, etc. The Agency advises parents “to minimize their children’s mobile phone use, avoid nighttime communications and reduce the frequency and duration of calls”.
Media Headlines
Research
Policy

France’s National Health And Safety Agency Calls For Reducing Children’s Wireless Exposures: ANSES 2016 Report

France’s National Health And Safety Agency Calls For Reducing Children’s Wireless Exposures: ANSES 2016 Report

France’s National Health Agency Calls For Reducing Children’s Wireless Exposures
The National Agency of Health Security of Food, Environment and Labour Report All wireless devices, from tablets, remote controlled toys, wireless toys, baby monitors, and cell phones should be subjected to tighter regulatory limits.
france-flag-1058699_1280On July 8, the French National Agency of Health Security of Food, Environment and Labour (ANSES) published a new scientific report “Radiofrequency Exposure and the Health of Children”.
Concluding that children are more vulnerable to radio frequency (RF) wireless exposures, the French report recommends immediately reducing exposures to wireless radiation from all wireless devices for young children. Acknowledging the inadequacies of current outdated RF regulations, ANSES recommends strengthening RF exposure limits with child protective safety margins and developing more sophisticated premarket test methods to fully assess  human exposures to RF radiation from wireless devices. The new report has made headlines across the country.
Report States Children Exposed More and Early
“Unlike previous generations, children are exposed today to multiple RF sources at a young age…Children are not miniature adults…because of their smaller size, their anatomical and morphological characteristics and the characteristics of some of their tissues, they are more exposed. In particular, the peripheral areas of their brains are more vulnerable than adults to RF.”
child-1183465_1920This French national report affirms recent EHT publications showing greater absorption and vulnerability of the young to cell phone radiation. IEEE/Access: Dosimetric Simulations of Brain Absorption of Mobile Phone Radiation: the relationship between psSAR and age.



Recommendations of the Agency
The government agency recommends to “reconsider the regulatory exposure limits” to ensure “sufficiently large safety margins” to protect the health of young children:
  • All wireless devices, including tablets, cordless phones, remote controlled toys, wireless toys, baby monitors and surveillance bracelets, should be subjected to the same regulatory obligations as cell phones.
  • Compliance with regulatory exposure limits should be insured for the ways that devices are customarily used, such as positioned in contact with the body.
  • Exposure limits for radiofrequency electromagnetic fields should be tightened  to ensure sufficiently large safety margins to protect the health and safety of the general population, particularly the health and safety of children.
  • Reliance on the specific absorption rate (SAR) to set human exposure limits should be re-evaluated and replaced through the development of an indicator to assess real exposures for mobile phone users that applies to various conditions: signal type,  good or bad reception, mode of use (call, data loading, etc.), location device is used on the body.
  • ANSES reiterated its recommendation, as previously stated, to reduce exposure to children: minimize use and prefer a hands-free kit.
Scientific Research Substantiates France’s Expert Recommendations
Wi-Fi tablet into head of child from tablet - Image“For several decades, my research and that of many others has shown that children and smaller adults will absorb relatively more radiation from mobile devices. Unfortunately, proper research on long term use has not been done to determine the full health impacts on children. I am one of many researchers who strongly recommend strengthening current regulations to protect children,” stated EHT advisor Om Gandhi of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, who has published multiple research studies indicating that children absorb radiation deeper into their brains than adults.
“Coming on the heels of the U.S. government study showing increased risks of rare tumors of the brain and heart tied with wireless radiation in rats, this new French government report provides a welcome reminder of the importance of protecting young brains and bodies. The absence of proof of harm in our children at this time should not be confused with evidence of safety,” added Devra Davis PhD MPH, FACE, Visiting Professor of Medicine, The Hebrew University and President of Environmental Health Trust. “We cannot afford to treat the young as subjects in an experiment for which we will soon have no unexposed control group,” she added.
“Our published research on cell phones but also tablets and laptops indicates that equivalent exposures to radio frequency results in different doses to specific tissues in children compared with adults. The wireless device certification process should be complemented with a computer simulation process using anatomically based models of different ages,” stated Professors Claudio Fernandez and Alvaro de Salles, EHT Advisors from the Electrical Engineering Departments of the Federal Institute and University of Rio Grande do Sul, IFRS and UFRGS, Brazil.
Over Twenty Governments Have Enacted Protective Policy
earth-11009_1280France previously enacted highly protective laws in regards to radiofrequency exposures. Wi-Fi is banned in kindergarten and OFF is the default setting in elementary schools (unless if specific classroom instruction requires it during certain time periods). French national law also addresses cell tower emissions compliance and labels Wi-Fi transmitters in public spaces. French cell phone legislation bans cell phones for young children, mandates SAR labeling, and requires that all cell phones are sold with headsets. This new report calls for tightening regulations even further in light of findings that children experiences serious learning and other problems tied with wireless exposures. Over twenty countries and governments have enacted various protective policies to reduce radiofrequency exposure to children.
ANSES also called for more research evaluating the health and psychosocial impact (academic learning, social and family relationships, etc.) in children, related to the use of mobile communication technologies, particularly because of addictive phenomena, disorders in circadian rhythms, etc. The Agency advises parents “to minimize their children’s mobile phone use, avoid nighttime communications and reduce the frequency and duration of calls”.
Media Headlines
Research
Policy

Thursday, July 28, 2016

SEND IN FCC PUBLIC COMMENTS "DIRTY" ELECTRICITY - August 11, 2016 Deadline

SEND IN FCC PUBLIC COMMENTS "DIRTY" ELECTRICITY - August 11, 2016 Deadline


The FCC has finally opened a docket to look at "dirty" electricity and sources of radiated RF from electronics.  The FCC standards related to "dirty" electricity, conducted RF, and inadvertently radiated RF have been developed primarily to prevent electronics and transmitters from interfering with each other.  

Please write in  by August 11, 2016 with a brief synopsis of how "dirty" electricity has affected your health and request that the new standards be set to prevent health effects.  The Stetzerizer "dirty" electricity meter was evaluated in Kazakhstan and health standards were set such that no more than 50 G/S units of dirty electricity should be allowed on building wiring to protect health (www.electricalpollution.com/documents/Sanitary_Norms.pdf).  The FCC should adopt this standard and require device and light manufacturers to engineer their devices to put out substantially less than that.  Frequencies above the range of the Stetzerizer meter should also have much tighter standards.  Their effect is related to capacitive coupling and energy.  A signal from the transmitter on a smart meter was found to be in violation of existing limits for conducted RF if the limits went that high (see  http://stopsmartmetersny.org/debunkingutility.html for more information).  Obviously this shows that new standards that extend the full range of existing and future transmitter technology are necessary to protect human health.  

Tightening of standards should extend to sources of conducted and radiated RF in cars.  Many with RF sickness have trouble with cars due to conducted and radiated RF from components not designed to minimize RF emissions sufficient to protect human health.  Sources include, but are not limited to, the alternator, spark plugs and distributor, fuel pump, air conditioning compressor controls, ignition switch, radio systems, and electronic displays.  Proper filtering and design could minimize much of this.  If this is a problem for you, be sure to mention it and ask that they revise these standards as well to protect human health.  Availability of stripped down properly designed models should allow most people with RF sickness to use a car again.

The docket does not explicitly deal with health, but comments should be put in anyway so they know that they have to address the health problems the inadequate standards are causing.  Health should certainly fall under point 1b  and 4a.  Feel free to address other points in the docket as well (attached), especially those with technical expertise.

Please take a moment to submit your comment.  This office is not the same as the office responsible for broadband.  I know they have had complaints from people about RF on wiring.  This is an opportunity to ask the people who can take action to do so.  Opening this docket is an indication that they are at least looking seriously at taking action.  Let's give them good reason to do so.

Best, Catherine


Protecting my health and that of others by using a hardwired computer in a low RF environment.  For more information, see www.electricalpollution.com

 
Comment Deadline of August 11 if anyone wants to comment.
 
Subject: [EMF] FCC PUBLIC COMMENTS FOR SMART GRID NOISE POLLUTION ISSUE!!!
 
 
PUBLIC NOTICE
Federal Communications Commission
445 12th St., S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20554
News Media Information 202 / 418-0500
DA 16-676
Released: June 15, 2016
OFFICE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY ANNOUNCES TECHNOLOGICAL
ADVISORY COUNCIL (TAC) NOISE FLOOR TECHNICAL INQUIRY
ET Docket No. 16-191
Comment Deadline: August 11, 2016
The FCC’s Technological Advisory Council (TAC), an advisory group to the FCC operating under the
Federal Advisory Committee Act, is investigating changes and trends to the radio spectrum noise floor to
determine if there is an increasing noise problem, and if so, the scope and quantitative evidence of such
problem(s), and how a noise study should be performed. In this public notice, the Office of Engineering
and Technology (OET) announces the TAC’s public inquiry, seeking comments and answers to questions
below for the TAC about radio spectrum noise.1
TAC Noise Floor Technical Inquiry
The TAC is requesting input to help answer questions about the study of changes to the spectrum noise
floor over the past 20 years. Noise in this context denotes unwanted radio frequency (RF) energy from
man-made sources. Like many spectrum users, TAC members expect that the noise floor in the radio
spectrum is rising as the number of devices in use that emit radio energy grows. However, in search for
concrete evidence of increased noise floors, we have found limited available quantitative data to support
this presumption. We are looking to find ways to add to the available data in order to answer important
questions for the FCC regarding this topic.
Radio spectrum noise is generated by many different types of devices. Devices that are not designed to
generate or emit RF energy but do so as a result of their operation are called Incidental Radiators. Most
electric motors, light dimmers, switching power supplies, utility transformers and power lines are
included in this category. There is little regulation governing the noise generated by these devices. Noise
from such sources is expected to be minimized with “Good Engineering Practices.”
Devices that are designed to generate RF energy for internal use, or send RF signals by conduction to
associated equipment via connected wiring, but are not intended to emit RF energy, are called
Unintentional Radiators. Computers and many portable electronic devices in use today, as well as many
new high efficiency lights, are included in this category. Current regulations limit the levels of emitted RF
energy from these devices.
Unlicensed Intentional Radiators, Industrial, Scientific, and Medical (ISM) Radiators, and Licensed
Radiators are devices that are designed to generate and emit RF energy by radiation or induction. Cellular
2
phones and base stations, unlicensed wireless routers, Bluetooth devices, broadcast TV and radio stations,
and radars of many types, are all examples of licensed / unlicensed intentional radiators, and microwave
ovens, arc welders, and fluorescent lighting are examples of ISM equipment. Such emitters contribute to
the noise floor with emissions outside of their assigned frequencies. These are sometimes generated as
spurious emissions, including, but not limited to, harmonics of desired frequencies and intermodulation
products. Regulations that permit the operation of these devices also specify the limits of emissions
outside of licensed or allowed (in the case of unlicensed devices) frequencies of operation.
We are looking for responses to the following questions to help us identify aspects of a study to determine
trends in the radio spectrum noise floor.
1. Is there a noise problem?
a. If so, what are the expected major sources of noise that are of concern?
b. What services are being most impacted by a rising spectrum noise floor?
c. If incidental radiators are a concern, what sorts of government, industry, and civil society
efforts might be appropriate to ameliorate the noise they produce?
2. Where does the problem exist?
a. Spectrally
i. What frequency bands are of the most interest?
b. Spatially
i. Indoors vs outdoors?
ii. Cities vs rural settings?
iii. How close in proximity to incidental radiators or other noise sources?
iv. How can natural propagation effects be accounted for in a noise study?
c. Temporally
i. Night versus day?
ii. Seasonally?
3. Is there quantitative evidence of the overall increase in the total integrated noise floor across
various segments of the radio frequency spectrum?
a. At what levels does the noise floor cause harmful interference to particular radio
services?
b. What RF environment data from the past 20 years is available, showing the contribution
of the major sources of noise?
c. Please provide references to scholarly articles or other sources of spectrum noise
measurements.
4. How should a noise study be performed?
a. What should be the focus of the noise study?
b. How should it be funded?
c. What methods should be used?
d. How should noise be measured?
i. What is the optimal instrumentation that should be used?
ii. What measurement parameters should be used for that instrumentation?
iii. At what spatial and temporal scales should noise be measured?
iv. Should the monitoring instrumentation be capable of determining the directions
of the noise sources? If so, how would those data be used?
v. Is there an optimal height above ground for measurements?
e. What measurement accuracy is needed?
3
i. What are the statistical requirements for sufficient data? Would these
requirements vary based on spectral, spatial and temporal factors?
ii. Can measurements from uncalibrated, or minimally calibrated, devices be
combined?
iii. Is it possible to “crowd source” a noise study?
f. Would receiver noise measurements commonly logged by certain users (e.g. radio
astronomers, cellular, and broadcast auxiliary licensees) be available and useful for noise
floor studies?
g. How much data must be collected to reach a conclusion?
h. How can noise be distinguished from signals?
i. Can noise be characterized and its source identified?
ii. Is there a threshold level, below which measurements should be ignored?
Procedures
Interested parties may file comments up until the comment deadline indicated on the first page of this
document. Comments may be filed using the Commission’s Electronic Comment Filing System (ECFS).
See Electronic Filing of Documents in Rulemaking Proceedings, 63 FR 24121 (1998).
 Electronic Filers: Comments may be filed electronically using the Internet by accessing the
 Paper Filers: Parties that choose to file by paper must file an original and one copy of each filing.
If more than one docket or rulemaking number appears in the caption of this proceeding, filers
must submit two additional copies for each additional docket or rulemaking number.
Filings can be sent by hand or messenger delivery, by commercial overnight courier, or by firstclass
or overnight U.S. Postal Service mail. All filings must be addressed to the Commission’s
Secretary, Office of the Secretary, Federal Communications Commission.
 All hand-delivered or messenger-delivered paper filings for the Commission’s Secretary
must be delivered to FCC Headquarters at 445 12th St., SW, Room TW-A325,
Washington, DC 20554. The filing hours are 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. All hand deliveries
must be held together with rubber bands or fasteners. Any envelopes must be disposed of
before entering the building.
 Commercial overnight mail (other than U.S. Postal Service Express Mail and Priority
Mail) must be sent to 9300 East Hampton Drive, Capitol Heights, MD 20743.
 U.S. Postal Service first-class, Express, and Priority mail must be addressed to 445 12th
Street, SW, Washington DC 20554.
People with Disabilities: To request materials in accessible formats for people with disabilities (braille,
large print, electronic files, audio format), send an e-mail to fcc504@fcc.gov or call the Consumer &
Governmental Affairs Bureau at 202-418-0530 (voice), 202-418-0432 (tty).
For further information, please contact TAC Spectrum and Receiver Performance working group cochairs
Greg Lapin, ARRL (GLapin@arrl.org) and Lynn Claudy, NAB (LClaudy@nab.org), or TAC
working group FCC liaison Robert Pavlak, FCC Office of Engineering & Technology

Report from the BioEM2016

Report from the BioEM2016

The 23-pages Report from the BioEM2016 is available (BIOEM2016_Report _DL_Final).
From the Introduction and Contents:Front page
BioEM2016 conference took place on June 6 -10, 2016 in Ghent, Belgium. Seen here is the view of the conference site, Het Pand, the large building on the left on the Leie River, a former monastery.
This report has been prepared for thePandora Foundation, Germany, andCompetence Initiative, Germany, which supported travel and participation of the author in BioEM2016. Parts of this report were published during the course of the BioEM2016 as blogs on “BRHP – Between a Rock and a Hard Place” site.
Only several topics presented at the BioEM2016 are presented and discussed in this report. For the full list of topics presented at the BioEM2015, please, consult the freely available program book. However, the book of extended conference abstracts is accessible only for the registered participants of the BioEM2015, and for the members, in good standing, of the BEMS and EBEA.
The content list of the report:
  • Introductory comments
  • Hot topic: the NTP study
  • Wireless charging
  • New avenues in epidemiology
  • Tutorial on safety standards by IEEE-ICES in USA
  • Chinese study – interesting but technically unreliable
  • Boris Pashe’s work – what is the future?
  • Non-thermal effects of RF-EMF exposures
  • Stress response as activation of heat-shock proteins and genes
  • Dosimetry: assures thermally-based safety limits… nothing else…
  • Skin and 5G technology
  • Exposure to RF-EMF and its impact on brain structure – yes and no…
  • Telcom’s concerns over information and misinformation
  • Wi-Fi and health – review with unfounded conclusions
  • Closing words…
https://betweenrockandhardplace.wordpress.com/2016/07/27/report-from-the-bioem2016/